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Petak/Džuma, 21 Džumede-l-uhra, 1436

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Apr. 9th, 2015 | 09:00 pm

Since the days in the Hijri calendar begin at sunset, rather than at the midnight following sunset, I am reconsidering what constitutes the rhythm of a day. In connection with considering different approaches to measuring daily cycles, I have read that the Christian monastic day begins with vespers. In thinking this way, I am finding a subtle change in my interpretation of what the evening is about. If it is to be viewed as the beginning of a day, then it starts with my favorite prayer, Maghrib (Akšam in Bosnian), and proceeds from there to some final preparations for the following workday (if needed) and some quiet time before going to bed. To think of these activities as beginning a "day" suggests a quality of pacing and expansiveness, rather than the more typically American race until total exhaustion in the evening with an unlikelihood of waking properly rested for the following day.

In Ibn Arabi's cycle of prayers for the evenings and the days of the week, Friday (whose "evening" is now) belongs to the planet Venus and to the prophet Joseph.

The Sun is still within 19 Aries.

The Moon is now in 23 Sagittarius: A bluebird perched on the gate of a cottage (Sabian symbol for 24 Sagittarius)

Today I was reading from Dane Rudhyar's 1948 book, Modern Man's Conflicts. He writes there about the complementary roles of the United States and the Soviet Union in the political balance of the time. He also wrote some things about propaganda based on fear that is still very relevant.

In the morning the Moon will enter Capricorn. Since that is a cardinal sign, it will simultaneously enter its 22nd mansion, The Minerals, whose letter is ظ and whose Divine Name is The Precious, الشَّرِيرُ.


Peace,

KH

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