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Ponedjeljak 8 Ramazan 1437

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Jun. 12th, 2016 | 09:08 pm

Planet of the day (according to Ibn 'Arabi): Moon

Prophet of the day (according to Ibn 'Arabi): Adam

The Sun is in 22 Gemini (in my 10th house): Three fledglings in a nest high in a tree. (Symbol for 23 Gemini from Dane Rudhyar, An Astrological Mandala)

The Moon is at 0Lib17 (in my 1st house). Lunar mansion (according to Ibn 'Arabi): 15, The Fifth Sky, Sky of Venus and House of Joseph, letter Rā, The Form-Giver (Al-Muṣawwir)

Lunar phase: First Quarter - Action (Phase names and keywords from Dane Rudhyar, The Lunation Cycle)

About a half hour ago, the Moon entered Libra (in my 1st house). About a half hour before akšam (magrib), the Moon will enter my 2nd house.

I woke up this past morning for sehur (suhur) and was reading an Al-Jazeera article about the high rate of incarceration among Maori in New Zealand on my phone when the red banner announcing the Orland shooting appeared as a breaking story. The rest of the day, of course, has been dominated by that story. The impotence of most of the rhetoric surrounding the event on social media left me feeling more frustrated than moved. I decided to wait until I felt that I had something to write or something potentially useful to pass along. That opportunity came when I saw the announcement of a GoFundMe page by Equality Florida, to which I contributed and which I posted on FB.

Before that tragedy unfolded, the thing that I had been planning to write about was my first iftar at the Bosnian mosque. When I arrived in the prayer space, I was pleased to see women and children along with the men. The imam was leading some dove (du'a) when I entered. After that, and before the azan, the imam urged the women and children to come away from the wall and toward the center of the room. There was something familial about that gesture, and it was moving to feel the atmosphere of the space shift into a more relaxed state.

I found some men and boys to sit with during the iftar, but either because of disinterest (a teen playing with his phone) or language barrier, I wasn't able to engage in any sustained conversation. It was awkward, although my aim was to see what it would be like to explore more of the institution than just džuma. It was only a partial success at best. When people began to disperse from the iftar I checked my watch and saw that it would be about an hour before jacija ('isha). Rather than face more potential awkwardness, I decided to leave for home. If I choose to go to teravih later this month, I may have iftar at home first.

There are obviously English-language options in the area, but in general I like the southeastern European atmosphere at this mosque. I continue to chip away at learning Bosnian, and I am able to understand more each time I go there. I don't live in a big enough city to have a circle of friends with whom I could have queer iftars or a unity mosque or NAJ or whatever, so I continue to make efforts to work with what I have available to me. After Ramadan I plan to get together with the Massachusetts sufis again, but I find that to be a little far to drive when I'm fasting.

Within the last year or so, the mosque added a dome and minarets. When I left last night, the minarets were illuminated:

rsz_img_20160611_210842669


Peace,

KH

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