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Jun. 8th, 2011 | 06:28 am

One idea from yesterday's post that I meant to follow up on a little bit was Zoller's characterization of psychological astrology as an elaboration of pop astrology.

I feel a little hesitant putting this into words, but that somewhat parallels my difficulties with trying to turn the Amma experience into a primary spiritual path. When one is in the middle of that "high," that devotional, "right-brain" space, a number of questions can be deferred, at least for a while. I think that a good deal of the post-cult literature represents a resurgence of faculties that tend to be denied or suppressed in certain environments. It doesn't necessarily mean that there's some kind of grand conspiracy (or a number of parallel conspiracies) involved, but it may be that some people are more sensitive to feeling unbalanced in certain environments than other people are.

In the Amma environment, whether people were traditional or whether they were New Age (or ex-New Age), it seem that the only reference points were very fluid and very mythic. Environments like that can give the appearance of being nurturing, especially when one is going through a difficult time, but ultimately they offer less on a practically personal level than more ordinary, more grounded perspectives do, and they can actually augment feelings of isolation, sometimes even to a rather dangerous point where those feelings threaten to spiral out of control.

I have found, too, that in the realm of astrology, many of the practitioners of Vedic astrology can be quite dogmatic about its merits. But the more that I learn about the history of astrology, the more it becomes apparent to me that all of the advantages of a disciplined classical approach are available within the Western model, which has some advantages as well (such as compatibility with more recent Western developments). It appears that the foundations of the discipline in general are Babylonian, Persian, and Greek. From there one branch developed in India (as usual, shrouded in tales of mythic Vedic origins) while another was further refined during the heyday of Arabic intellectual development. It appears that, for me, the romance of things Eastern and things Indian is drawing to a close, at least for now.

So, in short, people not being being there for me and things not making sense: I really don't need to continue to commit myself to such environments on top of working through the experience of grief, for things once had and now lost, and for things wished for and never had.

Peace,

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