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Jupiterian Grandiosity and Depression

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Sep. 21st, 2011 | 01:45 pm

The latest issue of The Mountain Astrologer has a short article by Frank Clifford on the dark side of Jupiter. While Jupiter is traditionally regarded as the "greater benefic" (Venus being regarded as the "lesser benefic"), there can be some serious problems with Jupiter's tendency to expansiveness.

One statement in the article stood out for me: "Interestingly, the Jupiterian individual (perhaps more so for those with the Ascendant or Moon in Sagittarius) often suffers from depression." Boy howdy! Ain't that the truth! (I have a Sagittarius Moon.)

So this is what started coming together for me: Jupiter was strongly involved astrologically during the time when I was friends with X and Y. At that time I seem to have been unusually susceptible to people who could convincingly contact me at a level where mutual feelings of specialness are a significant factor. Where better to meet such people than in a charismatic spiritual organization? (Spirituality, of course, is also associated with Jupiter.)

The Moon represents the mother, and also nourishment (emotional as well as nutritional). To the extent that I may have been originally nurtured as an extension of my mother's narcissistic needs, it makes sense that narcissistic flatterers would have a big impact on me later in life, particularly during the time when my mother was dying from cancer. It also makes sense that I would confuse this kind of attention with love, whether in the giving or in the receiving.

It seems that one of the reasons for depression among people with a Sagittarius Moon would be that, unless they are being buoyed up ego-nourishing attention (Jupiter is, after all, the great gas giant), they have a tendency to feel deflated by the drabness and indifference of ordinary reality. I have also read that people with a Sagittarius Moon tend to engage in somewhat outrageous (and perhaps inappropriate) humor. I know that I do that, and I'm not always sure why. Maybe it's also a way to stay "buoyed up" rather than deflated while in public. It also guarantees that one will be at the center of attention at least some of the time, whether positively or negatively.

I think that a part of my disillusionment with these people (and with others like them) comes from the fact that whatever tendencies I may have toward grandiosity are balanced by a sense of realism and hard work. There is a stable base to which I can return after flights of fantasy, but that may not be the case for some of the people who have, as it were, "let me down (in a big way)."

Om Krim Kalyai Namaha,

ak 

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